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newsFrench and Spanish major Jace Ma, left, and Assistant Professor of Anthropology Christine Schreyer have gone online to help resurrect disappearing languages.
French and Spanish major Jace Ma, left, and Assistant Professor of Anthropology Christine Schreyer have gone online to help resurrect disappearing languages.

Disappearing languages preserved through UBC's online efforts

Blogs keep people talking about endangered dialects

Their goal is to preserve disappearing languages and they are using modern communication methods to do it.

A group of students is delving into almost-lost languages and blogging about them in an effort to keep them alive for future generations.

Among the courses Assistant Professor of Anthropology Christine Schreyer teaches is endangered languages, and several of her students have taken to the Internet to talk about and raise awareness of tongues that are disappearing.

Schreyer says there are approximately 80 indigenous languages in Canada, of which only three are expected to survive: Cree, Inuit (Inuktitut) and Ojibwa. That is mainly due to these three each having more than 20,000 speakers and many children in their respective communities continue learning these as their first languages. But even these could be silenced as English or French take over in the communities where they are spoken.

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Meshkat Javid and Jane Hollenberg are looking for bike donations for the UBCycles program. The program allows students, staff and faculty at the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus to borrow a bike for a few days or an entire term, but donated bikes are needed. Meshkat Javid and Jane Hollenberg are looking for bike donations for the UBCycles program. The program allows students, staff and faculty to borrow a bike for a few days or an entire term, but donated bikes are needed.

UBCycles wants to get more people pedaling

Okanagan campus program loans bikes to campus commuters

Want to help the environment and get in shape by cycling to class but don't have a bicycle?

It's UBCycles to the rescue.

UBCycles, formerly known as UniCycles, is a program allowing staff, faculty and students to sign out a bike for a few days to a full term.

Meshkat Javid and Jane Hollenberg took over the program that started last year and are already adding features to the loan program.

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Susan Murch, Canada Research Chair in Natural Products Chemistry, has been awarded $150,000 by the Southern Interior Development Initiative Trust
Susan Murch, Canada Research Chair in Natural Products Chemistry, has been awarded $150,000 by the Southern Interior Development Initiative Trust

Grants to fund vineyard research, bursaries at four UBC schools

Southern Interior Development Initiative Trust awards total $275,000

UBC's Okanagan campus has received three grants totalling $275,000 from the Southern Interior Development Initiative Trust (SIDIT).

The awards include $150,000 for a three-year research project led by Susan Murch, Canada Research Chair in Natural Products Chemistry, to develop water efficiencies in Okanagan vineyards; $80,000 in bursaries for undergraduate medical students in the Southern Medical Program; and $45,000 towards bursaries in Engineering, Nursing and Computer Science.

Notably, the $80,000 award to the Southern Medical Program will be matched by an anonymous donor.

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Steve Buzinski, Bachelor of Management (Class of 2011)


Annette LaGrange, associate dean in the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus, has been instrumental in helping to revamp educational systems in different countries.
Annette LaGrange, associate dean in the Faculty of Education, has been instrumental in helping to revamp educational systems in different countries.

Social sustainability a key element in helping strife-torn countries

Rebuilding education systems requireS long-lasting strategies, says UBC professor

It is fine and well to travel to distant lands and help set up educational systems and programs, but if they are not sustainable they are doomed to fail.

So for Annette LaGrange, that long-term sustainability is critical to any program she works on.

LaGrange has been to many regions of the world to help establish educational programs, and she has discovered the important roles culture and history can play in the classroom and for the ongoing implementation of any new programs.

She joined the Faculty of Education as associate dean in September. Formerly dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Calgary, LaGrange spent seven years helping rebuild the education system in Kosovo, starting in 1999 after the conflict ended.

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Facilities Management has moved

Facilities Management has moved

Facilities Management has moved, but members of the campus community won't have to search far to find them.

Located in ADM103I, the new Facilities Management office can be found by entering the frosted door across from the Bookstore in the Administration Building.

Signage isn't posted yet, but the new location will be familiar to those who have visited the office of the AVP Administration and Finance in recent months.

Anyone who is looking to make Facilities-related inquiries -- such as work orders, key requests or operational questions -- are asked to call Toby Wesenberg (250-807-9272) or Lorna Campbell (250-807-8213) or email facilities.ok@ubc.ca.

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President's Service Award for Excellence nominations open until Feb. 29

UBC faculty, staff, and students are invited to submit nominations for the 2012 President's Service Award for Excellence, the top award presented to UBC staff in recognition of contributions to the university and excellence in personal achievements.

Up to five recipients are selected annually, and awards are presented during the graduation ceremonies. Each recipient receives a gold medal, $5,000, and a certificate.

Permanent staff members with 10 years or more of UBC service are eligible for nomination. Okanagan University College service is counted in nominees' years of UBC service.

To find out more about award criteria and the nomination process, visit the Focus on People website.

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Call for proposals: 8th annual Learning Conference

Scholarly Approaches: Evidence-Informed Teaching and Learning

The Centre for Teaching and Learning is putting out an open call to all faculty members to participate at the annual Learning Conference, being held May 2 and 3.

This year's conference theme, Scholarly Approaches: Evidence-Informed Teaching and Learning, invites educators to share their research and experience about the connection between research and learning. Take the opportunity to discuss how students learn best or how research informs approaches to learning.

Interested individuals or groups are invited to submit proposals for 50-minute sessions -- formats may include discussions, roundtables, and presentations. Each session is expected to have an interactive component.

The deadline for proposal submissions is Wednesday, Feb. 29. Registration is free for all UBC faculty and staff members.

To find out more about the Learning Conference, visit the Centre for Teaching and Learning website.

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Career Fair 2012 looks to attract more employers, more opportunities for students

The annual Career Fair is moving to a new date and location this year in a move to increase the number and types of recruiters interested in hiring UBC students.

The Career Fair will take place on February 2 in the two-level foyer of the Engineering Management Education building.

The traditional recruiters will be at the event, but this year's Career Fair will also feature some select not-for-profit industry recruiters.

Over 50 employer groups will be represented at this year's event, ranging from engineering and technology firms, to health care agencies, government, banking, and education groups. There will also be employer-led information sessions held throughout the day.

To find out more, visit the Career Fair 2012 website.

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Applications for graduation open

A reminder to faculty members with students looking to apply for graduation: applications are available via the online Student Service Centre.

Please encourage students to apply for graduation as soon as possible if they plan to graduate this spring. Applications must be submitted regardless of whether students intend to participate in the June 2012 Convocation Ceremony.

Graduation applications are available from now until Wednesday, Feb. 29. To find out more visit the Graduation website.

Are you ready to graduate?

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NSERC Undergrad Student Research AwardExploring natural sciences from
A to Z

Barber School and Human Kinetics Undergrad Student Research Award deadline set for Feb. 6

Students from the Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences and Human Kinetics have a good opportunity to be paid for at least 16 weeks of full-time research work this summer under the supervision of a NSERC-funded faculty member.

The application deadline is quickly approaching, but there is still time for students to work on their submissions for the 2012 NSERC Undergrad Student Research Award.

The submission deadline is Monday, Feb. 6. Applications can be submitted to Deanna Simmons, on-campus student employment program coordinator, in the University Centre (room UNC325).

To find out more about the award and its criteria, visit the Barber School website.

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Okanagan campus news available anywhere, any time

Don't want to wait until the next edition of The Exchange to find out the latest news about the Okanagan campus? Visit the Okanagan campus' online newsroom. (https://news.ok.ubc.ca/).

The newsroom is set up to be easily viewable on most mobile devices -- giving everyone access to the latest news anywhere, at any time.

The Exchange also has its own online prescence (https://news.ok.ubc.ca/exchange/) where faculty and staff members can keep up to date on the latest employee news.

Okanagan campus news is also available via facebook (facebook.com/ubconews) and Twitter (twitter.com/ubconews).

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peopleJeannine Kuemmerle

New aboriginal student advisor has strong UBC and
Okanagan roots

Jeannine Kuemmerle is no stranger to the UBC Aboriginal Centre.

The former intern joins the Aboriginal Programs and Services (APS) staff as the new aboriginal student advisor for UBC's Okanagan campus.

Kuemmerle was born in Vernon and graduated with a UBC Bachelor of Arts degree in 2009 with a major in English and a minor in history. After completing a year-long intern position with APS, she returned to school in 2010 to obtain both her secondary teaching certification and her Bachelor of Education degree, which she finished in the summer of 2011.

As part of her education training, Kuemmerle completed a thre-month practicum placement at Charles Bloom Secondary School in Lumby, BC, where she instructed English at the Grade 8 and 11 levels as well as Social Studies 9.  Working closely with Aboriginal education coordinators and students furthered her interest in Aboriginal education.

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Facilities Management welcomes new staff member

A warm campus community welcome to Toby Wesenberg, the new Facilities Management clerk.

Toby is originally from Winnipeg and has a BA from the University of Alberta with a focus in political science, French and literature. Wesenberg also has extensive travelling experience and pursues art and photography in her spare time.

Toby Wesenberg

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It doesn’t get more Canadian than this.

A Canadian moment at UBC's Okanagan campus

It doesn't get more Canadian than this.

Brandon Bates, foreground, and Mark Cianfogna take a break from classes to play some good, old-fashioned pond hockey. The two shoveled off a section of the pond on campus so they could strap on the blades and take a few shots.

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research spotlightResearcher Michael Russello with a tortoise that is a hybrid of a tortoise species native to Floreana Island (Chelonoidis elephantopus) some 320 kilometres away from its habitat on Isabela Island, and thought to be extinct.
Researcher Michael Russello with a tortoise that is a hybrid of a tortoise species native to Floreana Island (Chelonoidis elephantopus) some 320 kilometres away from its habitat on Isabela Island, and thought to be extinct.

UBC professor's Galápagos tortoise research published

International team detects descendants of species presumed extinct for 150 years

A species of giant tortoise thought to be extinct since the mid-1800s did not totally disappear after all. New genetic research has found living tortoises from the Pacific's Galápagos archipelago that have remnants of an extinct genetic line -- a discovery that could lead to restoring the lost species Chelonoidis elephantopus through captive breeding.

A unique species of giant tortoise once thrived on the Galápagos island of Floreana, but was presumed extinct soon after Charles Darwin's historic voyage to the Galápagos Islands in 1835 due to extensive hunting.

The results of the study suggest that direct descendants of at least 38 purebred individuals of C. elephantopus live on the volcanic slopes of the northern shore of Isabela Island -- 320 kilometres from their ancestral home of Floreana Island.

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Robert Young, associate professor of earth and environmental science and physical geography poses next to a pair of replica bear skulls that he recently acquired to be used in his ice age environmental class at the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus. The skull on the left is a replica of a Giant Short-Faced Bear which grew to 1,400 to 1,700 pounds and roamed from California to Alaska thousands of years ago. The skull on the right is of a Cave Bear which roamed Europe thousands of years ago.

Bear in mind...

Robert Young, associate professor of earth and environmental science and physical geography, poses next to a pair of replica bear skulls he recently acquired to be used in his ice age environmental class.

The skull on the left is a replica of a Giant Short-Faced Bear which grew to 1,400 to 1,700 pounds and roamed from California to Alaska thousands of years ago.

The skull on the right is of a Cave Bear, which weighed in at some 1,400 pounds and roamed Europe thousands of years ago.

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workshopsPeter Arthur

DATE (discussions about teaching excellence)

Scholarly Approaches to Teaching Excellence

The Centre for Teaching and Learning's teaching excellence discussion series continues tomorrow with Peter Arthur, director of the Centre for Teaching and Learning.

In this participatory session, Arthur will focus on evidence based practice and moving toward a learning-centred environment.

Date: Thursday, Jan. 19
Time: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Location: Science building, room SCI331

To register or find out more about this discussion visit the Centre for Teaching and Learning website.

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The power of emotional intelligence

Emotional Intelligence accounts for two-thirds of one's ability to be effective in their personal and professional lives. Take this opportunity and participate in a journey of self-discovery and improvement in an intensive and enjoyable one-day workshop on March 8.

This workshop will teach participants how to be aware of the competencies that can bring about personal success and provide confidential feedback on participants' personal strengths and weaknesses. Each participant will also recieve an emotional intelligence assessment.

Date: Thursday, Mar. 8
Time: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location: Deputy Vice Chancellor's boardroom
Cost: $200 (includes cost of assessment)

The deadline to register for this workshop is Monday, Feb. 23. To find out more visit the Human Resources website.

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Strategic leadership communication

The acid test of a good plan is the willingness of others to implement it. A key skill relevant to leaders at all levels is the ability to positively communicate and influence people in such a way that others willingly alter their thoughts and plans.

In this workshop, participants bring their own case studies and use the theory presented to hone their idea to maximize acceptance by their stakeholder group.

This workshop is targeted at those with leadership responsibility.

Date: Tuesday, Apr. 17
Time: 8:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Location: Deputy Vice Chancellor's boardroom
Cost: $200

The deadline to register for this workshop is Monday, Mar. 12. To find out more visit the Human Resources website.

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Workshops at a glance

Here are some professional development workshops for faculty and staff at UBC's Okanagan campus over the next few weeks:

January 19
Writing a Critical Analysis

January 20
Teaching Large Classes

January 21
RefWorks

January 23
Writing A Scholarly Article C/P (2)

January 23
Teaching Squares

January 23
Writing a Proposal

January 23
Dissertation Writing Group 1

January 24
RefWorks

January 24
TA Tuesdays

January 25
WebCT Vista Wednesdays

January 25
Java Junction

January 25
Working with Groups

January 26
Getting Started on Your Literature Review

January 30
Writing a Scholarly Article C/P (2)

January 30
Educational Technology Monday

January 30
Getting Started on Your Thesis: Formatting and Organizing a Major Document

January 30
Dissertation Writing Group 1

January 31
TA Tuesdays

February 1
WebCT Vista Wednesdays

February 1
PowerPoint, Effective Presentations

 

For a full listing visit the Okanagan campus events calendar.

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OKANAGAN CAMPUS
January 18, 2012

News

Disappearing languages preserved through UBC's online efforts
UBCycles wants to get more people pedaling
Grants to fund vineyard research, bursaries at four UBC schools
Social sustainability a key element in helping strife-torn countries
Facilities Management has moved
President's Service Award for Excellence nominations open
Call for proposals: 8th annual Learning Conference
Career Fair 2012 looks to attract more employers, more opportunities
Applications for graduation open
Exploring natural sciences
Okanagan campus news available anywhere, anytime

People

New aboriginal student advisor has strong UBC and Okanagan roots
Facilities Management welcomes new staff member
A Canadian moment at UBC's Okanagan campus

Research Spotlight

UBC professor's Galápagos tortoise research published
Bear in mind...

eventsEquity and Diversity Research Graduate Student Spotlight

Allied criticism and Indigenous literatures

The Equity and Diversity Research series continues today with a presentation by MA students Emily Kring and Kelly Mitton.

There is a history of appropriation and misrepresentation that has characterized the academic treatment of Indigenous cultural production in Canada. This presentation will look at Kring and Mitton's work, which proposes possible models for the ethical, allied criticism of Indigenous literatures.

Kring's research is concerned with contemporary Indigenous orature as reclaiming and adapting Indigenous histories toward decolonizing ends. Mitton's research examines the colonial displacement of Indigenous oral traditions and knowledge in Canada, tracing this to the English Protestant Reformation's privileging of written over oral knowledge.

Date: Wednesday, Jan. 18
Time: 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Location: Arts building, room ART183

This spotlight is free and open to everyone. To find out more email equity.student@ubc.ca.

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Student Wellness Expo and mini farmers' market organized for tomorrow

Health and Wellness has organized a Wellness Expo and a mini farmers' market for the campus community.

The Wellness Expo will feature all the information students need to make and maintain healthy plans in 2012.

Date: Thursday, Jan. 19
Time: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Location: Fipke Centre foyer

To find out more email campushealth.ubco@ubc.ca or campus.life@ubc.ca.

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Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention

Medicine out of joint?

Barriers to accessing medical cannabis among individuals with chronic illness

At this Partnerships in Research Series event, the Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention is examining one of the most comprehensive studies to date on medical cannabis use.

This presentation will look at data from cannabis dispensaries in the Okanagan as well as information about a larger, nation-wide study. Presenters include:

  • Zach Walsh, assistant professor of psychology and co-director of the Centre for the Advancement of Psychological Science and Law (CAPSL)
  • Rob Callaway, medical cannabis activist

Date: Thursday, Jan. 19
Time: 12 noon to 1 p.m.
Location: University Centre, room UNC334

This event is free and open to everyone. The seminar is also available by teleconference. To find out more email HealthyLiving.Research@ubc.ca.

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Research Tea Break Speaker Series

Perceptions of play from preservice teachers: implications for future practice

The next Research Tea Break talk takes place on January 25 and features Stephen Berg, assistant professor of education. Berg will be giving the talk Perceptions of play from preservice teachers: implications for future practice.

As the province of British Columbia has implemented full-day Kindergarten programming throughout the province, Berg is interested in gaining an understanding of how future educators view play and how they perceive play as a means for learning.

Date: Wednesday, Jan. 25
Time: 2:30 to 4 p.m.
Location: University Centre building, room UNC106

There is no charge for this talk and it is open to everyone. To find out more, contact the Research Services Office at 205-807-9412.

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The invisible universe

The invisible universe

Internationally renowned experts in radio astronomy are discussing the future of radio astronomy in a new series hosted at UBC's Okanagan campus over the next three months.

On Jan. 25, the first visiting lecturer of the series will be on campus to discuss the Atacama Large Millimetre Array telescope in South America. Doug Johnstone is from the Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics in Victoria, BC.

Additional talks are scheduled for Feb. 1 (Tim Robishaw, Magnetism in the Galaxy), Feb. 15 (Sean Dougherty, Radio Starlight), Feb. 29 (Roland Kothes, Supernovae Explosions), and Mar. 21 (Russ Taylor, the Square Kilometre Array).

All presentations are from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in Library room LIB 317. Admission is free and open to everyone.

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FCCS Visiting Author Series

FCCS Visiting Author Series: Ruby Slipperjack

Ojibwe writer and painter Ruby Slipperjack will be giving a free public reading on January 28, as part of the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies' Visiting Author Series.

Slipperjack is a professor and Chair of the Department of Indigenous Learning at Lakehead University.

Her first novel, Honour the Sun, about a young girl growing up in a tiny Ojibwa community in northern Ontario, earned much acclaim. She is also an accomplished visual artist and a certified First Nations hunter.

Date: Saturday, Jan. 28
Time: 3 p.m.
Location: Okanagan Regional Library -- 1380 Ellis St., Kelowna

This event is free and open to everyone. To find out more contact the Department of Creative Studies at 250-807-9648.

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Inner Fish Performance Co.

The House at the end of the road

Created by Creative Studies professors Denise Kenney and Neil Cadger, The House at the end of the Road is a story of a man, a woman, and a house, as told by six people and 64 two-by-fours.

This performance is Inner Fish Performance Co.'s latest investigation of Dick and Jane, a restless urban couple in endless pursuit of greener grass. The story is told in an open space and the audience is free to move throughout the performance. The piece is a hybrid of installation and performance art and traditional theatre staging.

The performers build their home throughout the show and become, along with the audience, the colonizers of the space.

Date: Saturday, Jan. 28 and Sunday, Jan. 29
Time: 7 p.m.
Location: Kelowna Art Gallery -- 1315 Water St., Kelowna

Tickets are available for purchase at the door; $5 for students and $10 for non-students.

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Active Chess Tournament

An active chess tournament has been organized for February 4. Interested students, faculty and staff members are invited to participate in this all-day event that will feature numerous matches and prizes for participants.

Games will run for 30 minutes for each player in a touch move, Swiss pairing format. Players will play six rounds -- games run at 9 a.m., 10:20 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 2 p.m., 3:20 p.m. and 4:40 p.m.

The cost to enter the tournament is $15 and games are not rated so no federation dues are required.

Players are asked to bring their own sets and clocks.

Date: Sat. Feb. 4
Time: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Location: Arts building, room ART102

To participate in the tournament, or find out more, contact tournament director Greg Bishop.

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What's Happening on campus

The Okanagan campus events calendar is the central point for online information about university-related events, on and off campus.

Events at a Glance:

For a full listing visit the Okanagan campus events calendar.

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Exchange your information

The Exchange is your newsletter. Let everyone know what's going on in your corner of campus.

Send submissions to University Relations c/o Chris Guenard.

Publication Date

Submission Deadline

February 1 January 28 (Friday)
February 15 February 11 (Friday)
March 7 March 2
(Friday)

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